The Future Never Looked Brighter – Women in Data Science

Fifteen years ago, after finishing grad school at home in Greece, I launched my career at a mid-sized IT company in New York City. Blissful in my own ignorance back then, I couldn’t really grasp how creative, evolving, educative and game changing my career in tech might be. Especially when I was one of the few women in the room.

Jump to 2019 and this picture has rapidly transformed. Tech is running at the speed of light. More women are choosing careers in IT, and with more startups than any other industry, technology is a rapidly expanding field. Yet, 74% of computer science jobs are occupied by men and according to Mercer’s most recent findings, are paid 25% more than women in high-tech companies[i].

Getting women interested in tech careers is a burning topic within the industry and high on the agenda for most tech companies. There is an immense shift in the focus for gender balance and has prompted me to try and tackle the stigma of women in tech and consider what initiatives might attract and retain female talent. However, with some companies if these efforts are purely to hit those yearly numbers on diversity and inclusion and to tick yet another box, we are far from creating an inclusive, innovative and healthy environment for today’s women in tech.

Personally, creating an equal and inclusive environment has been and is one of my core responsibilities and I am privileged to have found a “home” here at Amido – where numbers, agendas and boxes, are thrown out of the window and role models, awareness and support systems come into play. Equal pay goes without saying, finding and building those digital skills is who we are, and being surrounded by amazing engineers is what makes me happy to come to work every day.

[i] https://www.uk.mercer.com/our-thinking/the-gender-pay-gap-in-uk-tech-sector.html

Educate! Educate! Educate! – Closing the gender skills gap

There have been these archaic perceptions in schools and even family environments that discourage girls from pursuing STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Maths) subjects. And even later in the workplace, old school cultures can drive women out of roles. Breaking away from these stereotypes should be a priority. It is my firm belief that this can be achieved through education first.

To improve the gender balance in technology requires us to think outside the box. It’s our responsibility to engage young girls, create platforms for women returning to work, live and breathe inclusive environments, and train career changers. We need to challenge the perceptions and show that technology can be creative and that work-life balance in tech companies is not just a myth.

Whether through the form of mentorships, educational programs, or being a role model to the team, we can help change the negative stereotypes. We can engage in discussions and provide the information to train, mentor, and educate girls to understand what a role in technology actually is. Creating those support systems and welcoming workplaces is very helpful for anyone looking to progress their career and especially in a forward-thinking and innovative sector like tech.

International Women’s Day – Launching Women in Data Science Bootcamp

As we celebrate international women’s day, here at Amido we understand the importance of education and helping women beat the stigma of STEM based roles. With that, we have partnered with Microsoft and eight other channel partners to help support a Women in Data Science Bootcamp on the 2nd of May. This will be taking place at our Amido office in London and additional offices across the UK. The aim of the programme is to help assist women looking to get back into work. Specifically, in moving into tech and gaining a qualification, with the potential for securing their first data science role shortly thereafter.

There will be a total of nine Data Science Bootcamps that will run across the UK, supporting women through their first module of the Microsoft Professional Programme qualification in Data Science. The rest of the modules will be conducted online over the course of six months and at the end of each module a certification will be awarded.

‘80% of UK businesses plan to hire a data scientist in 2019’, according to a new report from MHR Analytics[i]. The Centre for Economics and Business Research (CEBR) predicts that ‘182,000 new jobs in the UK in big data and the internet of things will be created by 2020, including roles such as data scientists, analysts, developers and engineers’[ii]. Given that 93% of data scientists earn more than the average UK wage, I want to encourage more women to become data scientists.

If you are thinking of entering the Data Science world, looking to make a change and pursue a new rewarding and creative career, join us at one of the bootcamps where you can begin to develop the digital skills you need to become a Data Scientist. The training course is free of charge and more information and the application process can be found in the links below.

[i] https://www.mhranalytics.com/news/80-of-uk-businesses-to-hire-a-data-scientist-in-2019/

[ii] http://www.sas.com/en_gb/offers/16q1/cebr-big-data-internet-of-things.html

Become a Data Scientist

https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/athome/digitalskills/women-in-tech/

https://www.microsoftevents.com/profile/form/index.cfm?PKformID=0x6161853abcd

https://www.fastlane.live/uk_en/data-science-orientation-laas.html

We have so many fantastic people working here at Amido and it is tremendous to work alongside the courageous, bright and inspirational women and men alike, where we constantly push the boundaries and help strengthen our inclusive environment by challenging our processes, our perspectives, addressing the issues and celebrating diversity. We understand it’s our responsibility to pave a way and support those who consider a career in tech. We know it’s really up to us to make it happen and by playing our part in the wider mosaic we can help women explore the wonders of tech.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *